6 social activists to have on your radar in 2021

  • 3 min read

Photo by Hybrid on Unsplash

More of us than ever are engaged with social activism — it’s one good thing to have come from an otherwise disheartening 2020. So brew a coffee, grab your notepad, and jot down the following 6 names: they’ll be the social activists to watch in 2021 and beyond.

Erika Andiola

Erika Andiola

Erika Andiola is an immigration reform activist, fighting for the rights of undocumented Americans. You may know her from a now-viral video, where she was filmed confronting a republican senator about immigration reform?

She’s now the Chief Advocacy Officer for RAICES, which defends the rights of immigrants and refugees. You can follow her on Twitter.

Julieta Martinez

Julieta Martinez

Julieta Martinez is a 17-year-old Chilean climate and gender equity activist and a member of the UN’s Women’s Generation Equality Youth Task Force. Sometimes referred to as “The Chilean Greta Thunberg”, Julieta encourages other young people to campaign for the environment, inclusion, gender, health and welfare, and education. Her work is all about enacting change from the ground up. 

Read her article, ‘Collaboration and Voices from Young Women as a Path towards Hope’.

James Rucker 

James Rucker

James Rucker started Color of Change, the largest online racial justice organization in the U.S.. Using social networks to address issues and spread information, Color For Change empowers everyday citizens to call-out societal injustice. It was formed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina to help give disenfranchised Black people a platform, and has continued to strengthen citizens’ voices ever since.

He’s got a great back catalog on Huffington Post and can be found on Twitter, too.

Patrisse Khan-Cullors 

Patrisse Khan-Cullors

Patrisse Khan-Cullors is the co-founder of Black Lives Matter, which needs no introduction. She describes herself as a “freedom fighter”, dedicating her life to organizing and encouraging the population into fighting for change. 

She’s also an influential activist for LGBT rights and prison reform. Watch her on TEDbookmark her website, and follow her on social.

Rachel Cargle 

Rachel Cargle

Rachel Cargle uses her Instagram account to educate and spread her messages of social change. With nearly 2 million followers, she explores the often uncomfortable reality of everyday racism — something many people are guilty of without even realizing. 

With writing and reflection prompts, she teaches us to expand our understanding of racism and how it is perpetuated.

Latifatou Compaoré 

Latifatou Compaoré

Latifatou “Latty” Compaoré is fighting to end female genital mutilation in African countries. Latifatou followed in her mom’s activist footsteps aged just 14, and today she uses her talent as a singer to keep the narrative around FGM going strong.

Because of her age, she’s not technically allowed on social media! But you can find interviews with Latty on YouTube.

So how can you get involved?

One person can have a huge impact. And there are many ways thatyou can get involved in social activism, and make your voice heard.

  • Donate money to a cause you believe in. (Search here)
  • Show up to marches and rallies and add your voice to the conversation. (Check outIndivisible).
  • Write letters to your local legislators about the issues youreally care about — especially if it’s something you know they’re voting on. (Find your representative here.)
  • Educate yourself by reading books and memoirs about different social justice movements that you’re invested in. (Don’t buy them from Amazon, either – find them via your local bookstore)
  • Then educate others by having conversations with your loved ones about what you’ve learned. (Try not to preach, though — here are some tips).
  • Use your social media platforms to reshare and spread awareness for causes that are important to you. (These non-profit social media accounts are worth a follow)
  • Volunteer in your local community for charitable organizations. Check out GiveWell to learn which organizations make the highest impact.
  • Don’t be daunted or discouraged — stand up for what’s right. Just remember rule #1: Don't be a dick. 

That last one is easier said than done, we know. But community makes all the difference. 

Here at the Good Life Journal, we try to practice what we preach. Subscribe to our newsletter, and we’ll drop into your inbox with everyday ways to fight for a better world.

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